re: Tumblers, bright Fs, double NOAA Fs

Walter Nissen (dk058@cleveland.Freenet.Edu)
Sat, 18 Apr 1998 09:01:03 -0400 (EDT)

> Besides NOSS 2-3 r and Iridium 27, what other satellites tumble at a 
> good rate, thus giving a good visual display? 
 
> Jari 
 
I have little idea what you mean by "at a good rate" and "a good visual 
display".  Perhaps if you observed the various NOSS 2-n payloads you would 
also find they present such, though they aren't much like the objects you 
mention. 
 
Cheers. 
 
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Anyone can say anything.  That doesn't make it true. 
 
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Excerpted and annotated from earlier posts: 
 
12908 78-016C  FLTSATCOM 1 Atlas Centaur R/B 
  Maximum magnitude 2-3 with an approximate period of 18 seconds 
 
10820 78-042A  AMS 3 (OPS 6182) (DMSP F3) 
  Maximum about 3rd magnitude, period roughly 12 seconds 
 
16908 86-061A  EGP 
  About 3 very brief, bright (4th mag?) peaks in a couple of seconds period 
                                               [ I think you mean "interval" ] 
 
Spot 1 r BJ #17206, 86019BJ (About a 3 sec period, 3.5-4.0 mag) 
 
18710 87-106B  Cosmos 1904 SL-8 R/B 
  Maximum of 5th magnitude with an 8-1/2 second periods 
 
NOSS 2-3 r                                                    23907 = 96- 29 B 
 
Cospar   Date     time UT    ob total acc  #of flash  remarks 
ID       YY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS.s se time       fls period 
94- 56 A 98-04-14 12:06      AB  193.7 .04  10 19.374 +-.004, flsh peak mag +2 
 
Iridium 27 
 
Titan IV r/b #25018, 97064B  (About a 13 sec period but bright) 
 
COMETS H2 rocket (#25176)                                             98- 11 B 
 
                        Look into recent PPAS reports for other possibilities. 
 
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Recent OBS, some of less than the usual quality: 
Also please note new area code given below, now mandatory: 
 
PPAS (beginning): 
Walter I. Nissen, Jr., CDP, dk058@cleveland.freenet.edu, 55 Barrett RD #808, 
Berea, OH 44017-1657, USA, 440-243-4980, -81d 51.823', 41d 22.413', 256m, 7x35 
87- 62 A 98-04-13  1:04:29.5 WN  276.8 20.   5  55.   M, mag 3 or 2, C* 1869 
92- 94 A 98-03-23  0:46:53.5 WN     .   .5  10    .   irreg, some bright Fs 
94- 47 B 98-03-25  0:37:10.5 WN   71.0  .7  12   5.9  A or M, mag 5?, DBS 2 r 
96- 51 B 98-03-17  0:34:04   WN   33.5 2.    4   8.   M, mag 3?, C* 2333 r 
97- 17 B 98-04-18  1:32:02.1 WN   48.5 1.    6   8.1  A, mag 5?, C* 2341 r 
97- 51 D 98-04-13  1:48:16.3 WN   51.3 1.   14   3.66 A or M, mag 3?, Irdm 27 
97- 51 D 98-04-18  1:35:19.7 WN  147.4  .4  40   3.686 F, mag -1?, Irdm 27 
97- 64 B 98-02-06 11:53:16.5 WN   40.0 3.    3  13.3  mag 2?, Lac 3 r = 25018 
97- 64 B 98-02-16  0:51:  .  WN   14.4 4.    1  14.   Lacrosse 3 r = 25018 
 
87- 62 A = 18214 = C* 1869 
92- 94 A = 22286 = C* 2228                   10 flashes in about a minute 
94- 47 B = 23193 = DBS 2 r - Atlas Centaur 
96- 51 B = 24298 = C* 2333 r 
97- 17 B = 24773 = C* 2341 r 
97- 51 D = 24947 = Irdm 27 
 
On the 18th, my ongoing refinement of airplane-satellite discrimination 
suffered a serious blow as I picked up Irdm 27 giving off mag -1? F 
flashes as it descended in the South from a high Western pass of altitude 
74 degrees.  Looked just like an airplane, except maybe for the frequency 
of flashes.  In binocs I roughly estimated mag -2?, but then naked eye, 
mag -1? seemed more realistic, with Sirius usable as a comparison.  More 
evidence of the ordinary tendency to overestimate how bright extremely 
bright flashes are. 
 
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Additional suggestions, also highly recommended, not recently observed: 
 
94- 27 A = 23099 = SROSS C2 
88- 20 A = 18958 = C* 1933 
88- 50 A = 19210 = C* 1953 
88- 93 A = 19573 = C* 1975 
92- 80 A = 22236 = C* 2221 
various NOAA's 
 
Reprise: 
After seeing the remarkable, extremely bright, rapid, double flashes that 
I reported for 960529, I have been trying to keep watch on NOAA 7 thru the 
occasional breaks in the clouds here.  For some weeks I was unable to see 
those double Fs again.  Mostly I have seen a very irregular pattern which 
displays repeated bright Fs and many secondary maxima which vary in 
brightness and also perhaps in time.  But 960624 I caught the object early 
in its rise and dedicated myself to timing only the bright Fs. 
Consequently I was able to follow the object for a considerably long 
period and time all (but one of) the bright Fs over the entire period.  I 
also observed the rapid double Fs for a short while.  Again, they were so 
rapid I was unable to time the second of each pair in the double Fs.  In 
some ways this object is now quite reminiscent of the behavior of the 
spectacular, irregular flashers C* 1933 = 88- 20 A = 18958, C* 1953 = 
88- 50 A = 19210, SROSS-C2 = 94- 27 A = 23099, and DMSP F3 = 78- 42 A = 
10820 when they were at their most irregular.  Upon analysis of the 
recorded timings, the Fs are seen to come very regularly.