Superbird A: Correction

Jim Varney (jamesv@softcom.net)
Tue, 28 Apr 1998 22:40:04 -0700

Minor correction to the Superbird A observation, and observed tonight for 
the 4th night:

89-041 A 98-04-26 04:02:49.5 JEV 290.3 0.3  25 11.61  11.613s, +/- 0.028s
89-041 A 98-04-27 04:04:51.9 JEV 267.2 0.2  23 11.62  11.619s, +/- 0.010s
89-041 A 98-04-28 04:06:28.4 JEV 325.3 0.2  28 11.62  11.616s, +/- 0.024s
89-041 A 98-04-29 04:08:48.9 JEV 360.1 0.2  31 11.62  11.617s, +/- 0.029s

For the previous report the ending times were off by one flash period.  The 
above reports are correct.

If you aren't familiar with the PPAS flash report format, see the PPAS 
information on the VSOHP pages at www2.satellite.eu.org.

Combining all 107 observations results in a half-period of 11.616 seconds, 
+/- 0.013 sec at 95% statistical confidence.

Rob Matson wrote:

>Go out tonite at 9:00pm PDT with a pair of binoculars (or a telescope)
>and locate Procyon (alpha Canis Minor), about 40 degrees above the
>west-southwest horizon.  About 10 degrees below Procyon is a very
>close pair of stars:  delta Monoceros (mag 4.15) and 21 Monoceros
>(mag 5.44).  About 9:07pm you should start to see flashes from 
>Superbird A about 1 degree above the Monoceros pair

I'm in Northern California about 400 miles to the north.  The show started 
about 4 minutes earlier (4:03) and I saw it start flashing *below* delta 
Mon and watched it drift past and above the star.  Interesting how a few 
hundred miles on the ground can make an observable difference for an object 
at GEO heights.

 -- Jim


______________________________________________
Jim Varney
Member, Sacramento Valley Astronomical Society
www.calweb.com/~svas/index.html