RE: old article - Spy satellites on demand

From: Ted Molczan (molczan@rogers.com)
Date: Sun Aug 08 2004 - 13:07:24 EDT

  • Next message: Kevin Fetter: "RE: old article - Spy satellites on demand"

    Graham wrote:
    
    "I'm going by what i've read on the web as this article says itself:
    
    What these people fail to realize is that there are bad guys out there," said
    one senior intelligence official who wants to see some of the ****satellite
    trackers prosecuted. ***"
    
    For anyone wishing to follow the discussion, Graham has quoted an article by
    Anthony C. LoBaido, dated 2000 Jun 15, published here:
    
    http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=19083
    
    That sentence was immediately familiar to me, because I remembered it from an
    article by Massimo Calabresi, "Quick, Hide the Tanks!", published one month
    earlier, in the 2000 May 15 issue of Time Magazine, in which I and several other
    hobbyists are quoted or named.
    
    Here is the portion of Calabresi's article, from which LoBaido obtained the
    sentence that Graham quoted: 
    
    <<<This amateur network has run down most of the satellites--spy or
    commercial--that have ever been launched and are still in orbit, including what
    appeared to be a stealth satellite the U.S. deployed in 1990. All this info has
    been channeled to a website playfully called http://Heavens-Above.com that shows
    where the orbital snoops are every hour of the day or night--something that has
    some in U.S. intelligence circles understandably livid.
    
    "The fact that you can know readily where U.S. satellites are at any time means
    that if you're India or North Korea, it's that much easier to hide what you're
    doing," says an outraged senior intelligence official. If he had his way, some
    of the satellite trackers would be prosecuted.>>>
    
    Now here is LoBaido's version"
    
    <<<As one might expect, the publication of this information, which can be
    accessed by dictators like Iraq's Saddam Hussein or North Korea's Kim Jong-il,
    has many in the U.S. intelligence community in an uproar. 
    
    "The fact that you can know readily where U.S. satellites are at any time means
    that if you're India or North Korea, it's that much easier to hide what you're
    doing. What these people fail to realize is that there are bad guys out there,"
    said one senior intelligence official who wants to see some of the satellite
    trackers prosecuted.>>>
    
    Note the almost identical wording of most of both authors' second paragraphs.
    Also, the one sentence in LoBaido's paragraph that differs, is itself taken from
    another paragraph of Calabresi's article"
    
    <<<"What these people fail to realize is that there are bad guys out there,"
    says the concerned senior intelligence official. But the trackers counter that
    if they can do it with binoculars and brainpower, so can any enemy. So why so
    much secrecy around not-so-secret satellites?...>>>
    
    So, LoBaido used portions of Calabresi's article - apparently without
    attribution; therefore, implying to have used a source (i.e. Calabresi's) that
    clearly he could not have. Also, he did not include our counter argument.
    
    As for Calabresi's un-named "senior intelligence official", who, "if he had his
    way", "some of the satellite trackers would be prosecuted", he did not state
    which laws any of us who track "spy" satellites are violating. Russia, and more
    recently, France, have far greater tracking capability than I, and to my
    knowledge, have not been accused of violating any laws in so doing.
    
    Ted Molczan
    
    
    
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