Re: Terminology

From: Fred Valcho (fvalcho@yahoo.com)
Date: Mon Aug 23 2010 - 17:09:44 UTC

  • Next message: Ted Molczan: "RE: help identifying some thing i saw"

    marine fog is dependent upon location, upwelling, tides, and a few other 
    factors. Location being the most important for observations. I think inland a 
    few miles from the coast (San Francisco/south bay area) most likely is not an 
    issue. The marine layer is most affected by high pressure areas in-land, pulling 
    in cooler pacific area. This is an evening phenomena for the most part, but 
    could happen anytime weather conditions permitting. I see Derek hasn't 
    experienced any of this. Gilroy area - right?
    
    
    
    
    ________________________________
    From: Derek C Breit <breit_ideas@poyntsource.com>
    To: brooke@pacific.net; seesat-l@satobs.org
    Sent: Mon, August 23, 2010 8:49:13 AM
    Subject: RE: Terminology
    
    I ask because my friend with the good telescope says X37B is up around 4 
    am California time, but that's not a good time to image it because the 
    marine layer (fog) is dense then.
    ------
    
    Ummm.. Not for the last two days or even the next 2 days..
    
    For all things Satellite, Heavensat fits the bill..
    
    Derek
    
    
    -----Original Message-----
    From: seesat-l-bounces+breit_ideas=poyntsource.com@satobs.org
    [mailto:seesat-l-bounces+breit_ideas=poyntsource.com@satobs.org] On Behalf
    Of Brooke Clarke
    Sent: Monday, August 23, 2010 8:02 AM
    To: seesat-l@satobs.org
    Subject: Terminology
    
    
    Hi:
    
    If a satellite is on the dark side of the Earth at some later time the
    (1) Sun will rise on the satellite, yet the sub nodal point will be in 
    the dark.
    Later the (2) Sun will rise on the current sub nodal point and later the (3)
    Sun will be South of the sub nodal point, later the (4) Sun will set on the
    sub nodal point and finally the (5) Sun will set on the satellite.  Is there
    a graphical 
    representation of these 5 key points?
    I ask because my friend with the good telescope says X37B is up around 4 
    am California time, but that's not a good time to image it because the 
    marine layer (fog) is dense then.  Knowing these 5 key points on the 
    orbit would tell you not only when it would be a good time to look for 
    the satellite but also when the satellite would have a good view of the 
    Earth.
    
    -- 
    Have Fun,
    
    Brooke Clarke
    http://www.PRC68.com
    
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