Re: Request for Starlink magnitudes (Bram Dorreman)

From: Bram Dorreman via Seesat-l <seesat-l_at_satobs.org>
Date: Wed, 7 Aug 2019 18:36:29 +0200
Hello fellow observers and other interested folks,



My apparent lack of presence on SeeSat-L does not mean I stopped observing
satellites. There are two reasons I stopped with position determinations:

1.     The excellent program ObsReduce does not work on my laptop. I don’t
know the reason and did not yet found the time to solve this problem.

2.     Within a few hundred kilometers are three very active observers. Leo
Barhorst and Cees Bassa apply SatTools, written by Cees. And Marco
Langbroek is observing using camera's as well and , using .

1.     In Guide 9: Find a suitable area on the sky to wait for the
satellite

2.     If found follow it and try to determine its magnitude by comparing
it with stars not too far from it and with comparable brightness. (This is
the hardest part)

3.     While following I talk to my hand-held dictaphone and record in this
way what I saw and estimated (magnitude). In this way I can also report
other satellites I meet during the tracking of my selected object.

4.     Essentially is to report the time(s) of observation. Normally at the
end of the audiorecord. I should better use time at the beginning and time
at the end.

5.     After any observed transit I use a shortcut on my spreadsheet by
which it presents me a form, partly filled in by the satellite
identification (full International designation), the pseudo culmination
time and direction.

6.     I add my magnitude estimation, appearance and if available notes.

7.     Then I hit the ok-button and a record is generated for my Satellite
Log.



After a session I overhear my audiorecords and complement my Satellite log
records.



For the magnitudes of the Starlink-satellites I assumed that we are
especially interested in the maximum brightness of these objects. Therefore
I selected the ascending transits on the evening of July 29, 2019. Those
were coming up in my Sout-East, rising during the session until I stopped
observing by tiredness. The Sun was in my back all the time.



Every satellite observed was followed from a suitable point until it
disappeared after the roof or the trees. Sometimes I was able to estimate
the brightness three times during a transit. This depended on the
« availability » of reference stars.



The time accuracy of my observations of described kind are a couple of
seconds. I think this is not crucial. The way I present them here is like
Leo Barhorst presents his flare observations: a pseudo IOD-record. The
first part with satellite identification, site number, date and time are
like any IOD-record. Times are specified with second fractions of zero. No
specification of location and time accuracy. Any record ends with the
estimated (stellar) magnitude.



Here are the results :



44246  19 029M   4160 G 20190729204120000 S 5.3

44246  19 029M   4160 G 20190729204205000 S 5.2

44259  19 029AA  4160 G 20190729210737000 S 5.0

44249  19 029Q   4160 G 20190729211144000 S 6.2

44238  19 029D   4160 G 20190729211720000 S 5.9

44252  19 029T   4160 G 20190729212844000 S 5.8

44252  19 029T   4160 G 20190729212903000 S 6.2

44262  19 029AD  4160 G 20190729213507000 S 6.2

44262  19 029AD  4160 G 20190729213654000 S 6.0

44253  19 029U   4160 G 20190729213957000 S 5.8

44253  19 029U   4160 G 20190729214018000 S 5.7

44235  19 029A   4160 G 20190729214319000 S 6.0

44260  19 029AB  4160 G 20190729214735000 S 6.1

44287  19 029BE  4160 G 20190729215038000 S 5.6

44261  19 029AC  4160 G 20190729215726000 S 6.1

44261  19 029AC  4160 G 20190729215808000 S 6.4

44285  19 029BC  4160 G 20190729221029000 S 5.8

44285  19 029BC  4160 G 20190729221041000 S 4.9

44285  19 029BC  4160 G 20190729221121000 S 5.3

44280  19 029AX  4160 G 20190729221553000 S 6.5

44280  19 029AX  4160 G 20190729221712000 S 5.8

44280  19 029AX  4160 G 20190729221753000 S 5.6

44255  19 029W   4160 G 20190729222458000 S 6.0

44255  19 029W   4160 G 20190729222618000 S 4.9

44255  19 029W   4160 G 20190729222713000 S 5.5

44279  19 029AW  4160 G 20190729223113000 S 6.7

44279  19 029AW  4160 G 20190729223157000 S 6.3

44279  19 029AW  4160 G 20190729223319000 S 3.1

44265  19 029AG  4160 G 20190729223553000 S 5.4

44265  19 029AG  4160 G 20190729223721000 S 4.7

44265  19 029AG  4160 G 20190729223808000 S 2.5

44270  19 029AM  4160 G 20190729223933000 S 3.1

44271  19 029AN  4160 G 20190729224444000 S 3.9

44269  19 029AL  4160 G 20190729224605000 S 3.9

44269  19 029AL  4160 G 20190729224624000 S 4.2



Any constructive remark is very welcome. Also any question about my way of
working.



Bram Dorreman.

COSPAR Site Achel 1 : latitude 51.27931 N, longitude 5.47683 E. 35 m above
sealevel (WGS 84)
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Received on Wed Aug 07 2019 - 11:37:14 UTC

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