Re: Negative STS Observations

LWojack@aol.com
Fri, 24 Dec 1999 12:39:36 EST

> Never seen the ISS??   Get your binos (you probably won't need them) and 
> check out Vega in the NW tomorrow night (12/24) at 6:23pm.  That is the ISS 
> moving L->R.  It will enter into eclipse about 80 secs later at the Little 
> Dipper. 

I've only tried once or twice, if at all.  Maybe I'll try this Christmas 
season.
  
>  As for the STS/HST - It will pass extermely close to alpha-PsA (That 
pretty 
> bright star in the SSW near the horizon) at 6:26:30 traveling R->L..   
> Basically the same pass occurrs at 6:36:30 on 12/25.  You will probably 
need 
> you binos for these ISS passes.

I don't have a good horizon.  I'm going to try, of course, to see the STS 
tomorrow - but I don't have good odds for success.
  
>  BTW - the problem with telescope obs is the small field of view - about 
0.5 
> deg.  I've been doing some observing with my new Discovery 6" DHQ (Dob) and 
I'
> m lucky if I see the object for 2 or 3 seconds.   With the ISS or the 
shuttle 
> you'll only see it for a fraction of a second.

I have experience in this matter.  I think in the summer of 1998, I followed 
ISS for a minute to 90 seconds in my telescope (6", 1219 mm. F.L., 26mm 
eyepiece, 47x, 45' to 50' Field of View).  I was able to see the different 
tubes (for lack of the appropriate term).  The only problem is getting the 
object in your eyepiece - after that, the only difficulty is obstructions.
  
>  Good Luck and Merry Christmas.

Remember why it is celebrated!

Jonathan Wojack
LWojack@aol.com

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