Re: North Korean Satellite (was: Re: Seesat-l Digest, Vol 35, Issue 16)

From: ka8vit@ka8vit.com
Date: Tue Dec 18 2012 - 13:40:47 UTC

  • Next message: Brian Weeden: "Re: North Korean Satellite (was: Re: Seesat-l Digest, Vol 35, Issue 16)"

    I agree with all both of you had said.
    
    But, is this a case of it looking like a duck so we think it's a duck ?
    
    If I wanted to do something and did not want to give evidence
    of what I was doing,I would make it look like I was doing something
    else.
    
    Camouflage.
    
    I learned a long time ago that if the magician is showing you his
    right hand you should be watching his left hand.
    
    Just my opinion <wink>.
    
    Bill
    
    
    
    On December 17, 2012 at 4:33 PM Brian Weeden <brian.weeden@gmail.com> wrote:
    
    > I'd have to agree with Greg on this.  Yes, the North Koreans likely learned
    > some useful bits of knowledge that could be used to develop/improve long-range
    > missiles.  But every indication we have shows that this was a space launch
    > like those conducted by the US, Russia, and other countries.  All the proper
    > notifications were made beforehand and the trajectory matched both those
    > notifications and the flight path of a space launch.  That's important because
    > a missile test would have flown a completely different path, as shown here:
    > 
    >  http://allthingsnuclear.org/north-koreas-launch-trajectory-in-google-earth/
    > <http://allthingsnuclear.org/north-koreas-launch-trajectory-in-google-earth/>
    > 
    >  All of the data coming from the U.S. military and amateur observers such as
    > those on this list indicate a fairly normal satellite was placed into orbit
    > with an upper stage and a couple small pieces of debris.  Nothing out of the
    > ordinary so far, and largely consistent with what every other country does.
    > 
    > 
    > 
    >  ---------
    >  Brian
    > 
    > 
    > 
    >  On Mon, Dec 17, 2012 at 4:27 PM, Greg Roberts <grr@telkomsa.net
    > <mailto:grr@telkomsa.net> > wrote:
    >    > > Hi Bill
    > > 
    > >    I dont think I agree here.
    > > 
    > >    Wasnt the label of missile test applied by the western world whereas
    > > North Korea
    > >    always referred to a satellite launch ?
    > > 
    > >    I actually believe that this is a real satellite and we may yet get a
    > > surprise
    > >    or two. The fact that no transmissions have
    > >    apparently not  been heard doesnt really mean anything - I suspect it
    > > will only
    > >    transmit on command as its pretty senseless
    > >    transmitting continuously when there is no ground station to receive such
    > >    transmissions.
    > > 
    > >    Contrary to what many think I dont think this was just a propaganda
    > > mission. The
    > >    western world appears to be trying to
    > >    "play down" the launch as nothing more than a test - which of course it
    > > was -
    > >    but the objective was to orbit a payload and
    > >    they seem to have done a pretty good job of this so far.
    > > 
    > >    Cheers
    > >    Greg ZS1BI
    > >  > 
    
    
    
    ====================================
    Bill Chaikin, KA8VIT
    USS COD Amateur Radio Club - W8COD
    WW2 Submarine USS COD SS-224 (NECO)
    
    ka8vit@ka8vit.com
    http://ka8vit.com
    http://www.usscod.org
    ====================================
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