Re: North Korean Satellite (was: Re: Seesat-l Digest, Vol 35, Issue 16)

From: Jonathan W (tlj1899@gmail.com)
Date: Mon Dec 24 2012 - 05:45:56 UTC

  • Next message: Tony Beresford: "satobs dec 24 @ 8597"

    Apologies for reviving an old thread, but is it reasonable to suggest that
    this was both a missile test (proving that they are capable of delivering a
    payload a substantial distance downrange), and also to demonstrate that
    they can, at the very least, place an object into a desired orbit?  And if
    they were to go to the trouble of placing an object into orbit, you would
    think they would actually place a transceiver on the object, if not an
    actual functional payload.  Since this is North Korea we are talking about,
    the possibility of propaganda value cannot be immediately discounted.
    
    Jonathan
    On Dec 18, 2012 9:05 AM, "Brian Weeden" <brian.weeden@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > I have not seen a single piece of evidence to suggest that this was a
    > missile test, only political spin arguing that it was so.  If someone has
    > some evidence regarding the booster, flight path, flight sequencing, what
    > was placed into orbit, or anything else about this launch that suggests it
    > was a missile test, I'd be interested to hear it.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > ---------
    > Brian
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > On Tue, Dec 18, 2012 at 8:40 AM, ka8vit@ka8vit.com <ka8vit@ka8vit.com
    >wrote:
    >
    > > **
    > >  I agree with all both of you had said.
    > >
    > >  But, is this a case of it looking like a duck so we think it's a duck ?
    > >
    > >  If I wanted to do something and did not want to give evidence
    > >  of what I was doing,I would make it look like I was doing something
    > >  else.
    > >
    > >  Camouflage.
    > >
    > >  I learned a long time ago that if the magician is showing you his
    > >  right hand you should be watching his left hand.
    > >
    > >  Just my opinion <wink>.
    > >
    > >  Bill
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > On December 17, 2012 at 4:33 PM Brian Weeden <brian.weeden@gmail.com>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > I'd have to agree with Greg on this.  Yes, the North Koreans likely
    > > learned some useful bits of knowledge that could be used to
    develop/improve
    > > long-range missiles.  But every indication we have shows that this was a
    > > space launch like those conducted by the US, Russia, and other
    countries.
    > >  All the proper notifications were made beforehand and the trajectory
    > > matched both those notifications and the flight path of a space launch.
    > >  That's important because a missile test would have flown a completely
    > > different path, as shown here:
    > >
    > >
    > >
    http://allthingsnuclear.org/north-koreas-launch-trajectory-in-google-earth/
    > >
    > >  All of the data coming from the U.S. military and amateur observers
    such
    > > as those on this list indicate a fairly normal satellite was placed into
    > > orbit with an upper stage and a couple small pieces of debris.  Nothing
    out
    > > of the ordinary so far, and largely consistent with what every other
    > > country does.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >  ---------
    > > Brian
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >  On Mon, Dec 17, 2012 at 4:27 PM, Greg Roberts <grr@telkomsa.net> wrote:
    > >
    > > Hi Bill
    > >
    > > I dont think I agree here.
    > >
    > > Wasnt the label of missile test applied by the western world whereas
    North
    > > Korea
    > > always referred to a satellite launch ?
    > >
    > > I actually believe that this is a real satellite and we may yet get a
    > > surprise
    > > or two. The fact that no transmissions have
    > > apparently not  been heard doesnt really mean anything - I suspect it
    will
    > > only
    > > transmit on command as its pretty senseless
    > > transmitting continuously when there is no ground station to receive
    such
    > > transmissions.
    > >
    > > Contrary to what many think I dont think this was just a propaganda
    > > mission. The
    > > western world appears to be trying to
    > > "play down" the launch as nothing more than a test - which of course it
    > > was -
    > > but the objective was to orbit a payload and
    > > they seem to have done a pretty good job of this so far.
    > >
    > > Cheers
    > > Greg ZS1BI
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > ====================================
    > > Bill Chaikin, KA8VIT
    > > USS COD Amateur Radio Club - W8COD
    > > WW2 Submarine USS COD SS-224 (NECO)
    > >
    > > ka8vit@ka8vit.com
    > > http://ka8vit.com
    > > http://www.usscod.org
    > > ====================================
    > >
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