Re: ISS solar transit over Bangalore - 9th February, 2014

From: Satcom <john_at_satcom.freeserve.co.uk>
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2014 08:05:44 -0000
Hi Sankar

That is an excellent result , well done you were right on the centre line.
All that hard work before hand paid off !

Regards

John

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----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Sankaranarayanan K V" <kvsankar_at_gmail.com>
To: "seesat-l" <seesat-l_at_satobs.org>
Sent: Monday, February 10, 2014 7:51 AM
Subject: ISS solar transit over Bangalore - 9th February, 2014


> This is what I could capture of yesterday's ISS solar transit event over
> Bangalore:
>
> https://plus.google.com/112432554978969727104/posts/ZhVgvc8Qj5H
>
> I am very thankful to this group who helped with the preparation -
> specifically, Thierry Legault, Jon Mikel, John Locker, and Marco 
> Langbroek.
>
> Photography was done in two ways: 1. Using a Canon EF 100-400 lens at 400
> mm focal length together with a 1.4X tele-converter (effective focal 
> length
> of 560 mm) on a Canon EOS 60D for still photography and 2. Using an 
> Explore
> Scientific ED 80 mm f/6 refractor on a Canon EOS 1000D for 1920x1080p 30
> fps video.  Baader AstroSolar filter of visual density was used in both.
> Tracking was done using a SkyWatcher NEQ6 Pro mount. The stacked image at
> the link above is from the first setup.
>
> The transit lasted about 2 seconds. The image is a stack of 10 frames
> during those 2 seconds. Since this was my first attempt, I didn't want to
> capture RAW images and stop the high speed shooting early - within 1.5
> seconds of starting - which my camera body allowed. So I went for JPEG
> still capture which allowed a longer duration of continuous high speed
> shooting.
>
> The seeing conditions were not very good as the sun was low on the horizon
> (19 degrees altitude) and the ISS was at a distance of about 1033 km
> subtending an angle of about 26 arc seconds (0.43 arc minutes) compared
> against Sun's angular diameter at the transit time of about 1945 arc
> seconds (32.42 arc minutes).
>
> I should aim to capture some structure of the ISS next time with better
> sharpness and contrast. For now, I think, I am only imagining a thick H
> seeing the image.
>
> The following prediction sites and/or applications were used in locating
> the place to shoot from and determining the timing:
>
>   1. CalSky (http://www.calsky.com/)
>   2. Havensat (http://www.heavensat.ru/english/)
>   3. ISS Transit Prediction Android application (
> 
> https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ed_morana.iss_transit_prediction_free&hl=en
>   )
>
> Though there were variations between these tools some days prior to the
> event, they all converged eventually closer to the event.
>
> During the shoot, timing was obtained from a smart phone with GPS. The
> Android app Smart GPS Time (
> https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.pautinanet.smartgpstime&hl=en)
> was used to time the event. This app shows both GPS derived local time and
> the local clock time on the phone.
>
> Regards
> Sankar
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Received on Mon Feb 10 2014 - 08:08:34 UTC

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