Re: Tracking SpaceX Starlink-2 launch

From: satrack--- via Seesat-l <seesat-l_at_satobs.org>
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2020 22:01:13 +0100 (CET)
I agree with your results. I've generated links to simulate those viewing opportunities:

Little Rock:
http://www.satflare.com/track.asp?q=StarLinkLaunch&lat=34.6&lon=-92.3&jd=2458855.99410

Houston TX:
http://www.satflare.com/track.asp?q=StarLinkLaunch&lat=29.7&lon=-95.4&jd=2458855.99410

Dallas TX:
http://www.satflare.com/track.asp?q=StarLinkLaunch&lat=32.77&lon=-96.8&jd=2458855.99410

New Orleans:
http://www.satflare.com/track.asp?q=StarLinkLaunch&lat=29.9&lon=-90&jd=2458855.99410

Oklahoma City:
http://www.satflare.com/track.asp?q=StarLinkLaunch&lat=35.5&lon=-97.5&jd=2458855.99410

San Antonio TX:
http://www.satflare.com/track.asp?q=StarLinkLaunch&lat=29.4&lon=-98.5&jd=2458855.99410

Simone


 




> Il 6 gennaio 2020 alle 18.03 ronlee--- via Seesat-l <seesat-l_at_satobs.org> ha scritto:
> 
> 
> Thanks for adding the elset.
> 
> I ran Skymap for several places in the south central USA
> (7 January 2020).  Run your own predictions to verify local
> viewing opportunities.  Allow several minutes time tolerance.
> 
> STARLINK-2 SINGLE SAT (TS Kelso)
> 
> 1 72001C 20001B 20007.13926618 .00967871 00000-0 22177-2 0 00000
> 2 72001 053.0046 037.8712 0009525 327.1024 294.0471 15.96209869000011
> 
> 1) For Colorado Springs, CO, there is a poor pass at 451 AM MST on 7
> January. Given that, I checked Little Rock, AR and there is an adequate
> pass at 5:51:30 (Hour:Minute:Second) AM CST. Azimuth 193 degrees,
> elevation 24 degrees. They are coming out of shadow and moving eastward
> (left as you face south as they drop towards the horizon). If they are
> bright, it may be an awesome sight having 60 bright objects showing up
> coming out of Earth's shadow.
> 
> 2) For Houston TX it is much better. The satellites exit shadow around
> 5:51:30 AM CST to the left of the bright star Arcturus as you face east.
> Around azimuth 83 degrees and elevation 63 degrees. They drop towards the
> horizon (right as you face east) and pass by Mars around 5:52:55 AM.
> Azimuth around 129 degrees, elevation 20 degrees.
> 
> 3) Dallas TX area. Exits shadow around 5:51:30 AM CST at azimuth 138
> degrees, elevation 30 degrees and moves almost straight down.
> 
> 4) New Orleans. Looking nice here. Exits Earth's shadow around 5:51:40 CST
> at an azimuth of 261 degrees (almost west) and elevation of 40 degrees.
> That is about ten degrees to the lower right of the bright star Regulus in
> the constellation Leo. Look due south at about 31 degrees elevation around
> 5:52:45 AM.
> 
> 5) Birmingham, AL. Too low.
> 
> 6) Oklahoma City. Shadow exit 5:51:40 CST. Azimuth 148 degrees, elevation
> 17 degrees. Moving down and slightly left (north). I would get up for it.
> 
> 7) San Antonio TX. Look at azimuth 88 degrees (~due east) at 5:51:40 AM
> CST, elevation 28 degrees as it exits the shadow. It moves down and to the
> right towards the southeastern horizon.
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Seesat-l mailing list
> http://mailman.satobs.org/mailman/listinfo/seesat-l
_______________________________________________
Seesat-l mailing list
http://mailman.satobs.org/mailman/listinfo/seesat-l
Received on Mon Jan 06 2020 - 15:01:55 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.0 : Mon Jan 06 2020 - 21:01:55 UTC