Cosmos 2360 r

Walter Nissen (dk058@cleveland.freenet.edu)
Thu, 30 Jul 1998 13:08:18 -0400 (EDT)

OBS: 
 
I wrote: 
 
> I would guess 25406 is a Tselina-2 and 25407 will have more in 
> common with 23704 and the earlier Zenit-2's which dropped Tselinas than 
> with 25400.  Thus, look for .4 s. 
 
Or, maybe not.  Clouds were so troublesome, I'm not totally certain of the 
identification, but I saw a bright object in place on schedule, and there 
is no other consistent object in my QuickSat menu.  I didn't see it for 
very long, clouds interfering, but while high in the North, it exhibited 
brief dips with a period of 3.78 s. 
 
PPAS(beginning): 
98- 45 B 98-07-30  4: 9:50.6 WN   22.7  .8   6    3.78 __', C* 2360 r, 
                       minima measured as much more precise than A or M maxima 
 
2360 r 
1 25407U 98045B   98210.29894263 -.00000048  00000-0  00000+0 0    57 
2 25407  71.0128 129.0425 0009475 274.0517  85.9540 14.14841495   139 
 
Cheers. 
 
Walter Nissen                   dk058@cleveland.freenet.edu 
-81.8637, 41.3735, 256m elevation 
 
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Ground tracks and orthographic views are diversions for the visual observer. 
QuickSat provides your nightly menu, giving you the information you actually 
need.  Supplement with a planetarium/mapping program, if desired. 
 
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Details: 
Better later elset, from OIG: 
IRIDIUM 25 
1 24904U 97043B   98209.15089578 -.00000018 +00000-0 -13647-4 0 02284
2 24904 086.3988 258.2537 0002595 072.9307 287.2164 14.34216639048971