Re: Visual Decay Confirmation

Cornelio Bouis (cbouis@interneeds.net)
Mon, 14 Jun 1999 18:55:51 -0400

Well Quinn, the more I read the messages on this list the more I understand
how lucky I was.
I actually saw the reentry of Cosmos 2335. This was on New Years eve 1998 at
23:45 local time (1 jan 99, 03:45 UTC).
It was a beautiful fireball. It was seen by a lot of people here (Curacao).
Of course I don't think anybody (here!) had any advance warning and it was
seen probably more because of the ongoing fireworks that anything else.
A couple of email friends and myself were even plotting the exact path and
trying to figure out a probable crash site. That hasn't really succeeded
(yet!).
It's still a gamble but these decay alerts really narrow things down a bit.

Keep looking

Cornelio Bouis
12.1303N 68.8906W


-----Original Message-----
From: Quinster7@aol.com <Quinster7@aol.com>
To: SeeSat-L@blackadder.lmsal.com <SeeSat-L@blackadder.lmsal.com>
Date: Monday, June 14, 1999 3:52 PM
Subject: Visual Decay Confirmation


>I find all of these decay alerts very interesting, but how often are these
>decays actually observed visually by a person on the ground?  I've
subscribed
>to this mailing list for probably at least a year now and read nearly
>everything but can't recall anyone ever posting an observation report of a
>satellite decay.  I do remember seeing some links to articles at various
news
>websites about satellite decays observed by the general public, but not by
>anyone on this list.  Perhaps my memory is just short.  I am wondering how
>lucky you have to be to actually observe a decay and how often someone on
>this list does.  I look forward to any stories that come out of this
message.
>
>Quinn McCleery
>Raleigh, NC
>
>