It's Not Just a Good Idea, It's the LAW (was:Re: Washington Post satellite article

From: Curt Porter (portercw@bellsouth.net)
Date: Sun Mar 23 2003 - 21:20:18 EST

  • Next message: Jari: "Grace Flares"

       That is a cryptic and very weird article. As I understand things,
    equatorial orbit "slots" are allocated to various countries, not
    just to those lying below on the equator. What "politics" go into that
    allocation is beyond this list, I think.  A geosat can serve a region
    if it is parked on a longitude within about 70 degrees of the region's
    longitude, depending on local terrain. As far as technical constraints
    go they can be "stacked" very close together in the Clarke Belt with
    antenna polarity, power and wavelength used dictating how close, but
    it's closer than 2 degrees apart as seen from the ground.
    
       The humorous part:
    >Unlike geostationary communication satellites,
    >    which hover 22,500 miles in space as they spin in sync with
    >    the earth, low-orbit satellites are permitted under international
    >    law to spin around the globe at over 17,000 mph."
    
    implies that it's illegal for a LEO satellite to go below 17,000 mph!
    I would certainly call it decadent but never thought of international
    illegality issues ;-)
    peace
    Curt in Tennessee
    
    
    
    
    Kevin Mangis wrote:
    > 
    > The Washington Post has an interesting article entitled "Pentagon
    > Scrambles for Satellites" here:
    >   http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A56320-2003Mar19.html
    > 
    > I was interested in the following quote from this article:
    > 
    >   "The shortage of capacity over Iraq is in part a result of the
    >    country's historic refusal to allow companies to put satellites
    >    in stationary orbit over the country, according the London
    >    Satellite Exchange's Chabert [Nathanael G. Chabert, chief
    >    technical officer of the London Satellite Exchange]. The
    >    communications satellites now serving Iraq are, in effect,
    >    relaying signals to the region from other orbits."
    > 
    > Since Iraq is not on the equator, obviously there can't be any
    > geosynchronous satellites directly overhead.  But the article certainly
    > implies that a satellite could be put in a stationary orbit over Iraq.
    > Am I missing something?  Could the article referring to geosynchronous
    > slots that have been allocated to Iraq although they are not directly
    > over Iraq?  I also don't understand the comment about relaying signals
    > from other orbits, since a signal can go directly between a
    > geosynchronous satellite and Iraq.
    > 
    > The article goes on to say:
    > 
    >   "But not all satellites are affected by the international
    >    restrictions. Unlike geostationary communication satellites,
    >    which hover 22,500 miles in space as they spin in sync with
    >    the earth, low-orbit satellites are permitted under international
    >    law to spin around the globe at over 17,000 mph."
    > 
    > Are there international restrictions such that countries on the equator
    > have the rights to all geosynchronous slots overhead?  I always thought
    > that geosynchronous slots were assigned by international treaty -- what
    > "international restrictions" does the article refer to?
    > 
    > Thanks in advance for your insights.
    > 
    > - Kevin
    > 
    > __________________________________________________
    > Do you Yahoo!?
    > Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
    > http://platinum.yahoo.com
    > 
    > -----------------------------------------------------------------
    > To unsubscribe from SeeSat-L, send a message with 'unsubscribe'
    > in the SUBJECT to SeeSat-L-request@satobs.org
    > List archived at http://www.satobs.org/seesat/seesatindex.html
    
    -- 
    "Those who would give up liberty, for safety, deserve neither,
     and will soon have none." - Dr. Benjamin Franklin - 1776
    
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    To unsubscribe from SeeSat-L, send a message with 'unsubscribe'
    in the SUBJECT to SeeSat-L-request@satobs.org
    List archived at http://www.satobs.org/seesat/seesatindex.html
    



    This archive was generated by hypermail 2b29 : Sun Mar 23 2003 - 21:20:28 EST