Re: Decay Forecasr ROSAT

From: Jim Scotti (jscotti@pirl.lpl.Arizona.EDU)
Date: Sat Oct 22 2011 - 03:45:43 UTC

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    Sorry Paul, I looked through my photos and I did not see it.  It was either 
    in between 15 second exposures or too faint (or fast) to expose enough to 
    pick it up.  I only had the ISO set to 400 and f/2.8, but it was cooking.  I 
    don't think I can say how close to on time it was from just my eyeballs - 
    probably within 30 seconds of the prediction on H-A?  That was definitely 
    close than UARS was a day before its decay when it was at least a minute 
    early.  A friend of mine, however, got a series of 2 second exposures under 
    clear sky in Tucson - he posted his images on spaceweather.com about an hour 
    or so ago.  Search for David Harvey.  He can probably calibrate his cameras 
    for you and he has a bunch of 2 second exposures that show it quite clearly.
    
    Jim.
    
    On Sat, 22 Oct 2011, Paul Salanitri wrote:
    
    > Hi Jim,
    >
    > Excellent!
    >
    > Would you have a time (to the second if possible) of the near zenith pass?
    > (Can you also calibrate camera time [photo a time source])
    >
    > This will help in working out how much the TLEs have drifted by.
    >
    > I think if we can get this, we can tune up the TLE prediction (and not have
    > to wait for space-track).
    >
    >
    > Paul Salanitri
    >
    >
    > On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 12:04 PM, Jim Scotti <
    > jscotti@pirlmail.lpl.arizona.edu> wrote:
    >
    >> Just got through watching a pass of ROSAT almost straight overhead (Heavens
    >> Above predicted 90 degree elevation at max) from Kitt Peak.  Unfortunately,
    >> clouds covered most of its path overhead but I caught 2 brief glimpses as it
    >> passed near our zenith.  It was brighter than predicted - and a bit orangish
    >> in color but otherwise appeared to be pretty close in time to the H-A
    >> prediction.  I was expecting it to be early and was thinking I must have
    >> missed it due to the clouds when I caught sight of it thru a small break in
    >> the clouds.  I tried to pick it up later but the clouds kept it hidden, so I
    >> didn't check my watch for timing until around a minute after I saw it.  I
    >> had my camera with fisheye lens taking exposures, but I haven't downloaded
    >> them to see if I got it yet.
    >>
    >> Jim.
    >>
    >> It is difficult to say what is impossible, for the dream of yesterday is
    >> the hope of today and the reality of tomorrow. - Dr. Robert H. Goddard
    >> ----------
    >> Jim Scotti
    >> Lunar & Planetary Laboratory
    >> University of Arizona
    >> Tucson, AZ 85721 USA                 http://www.lpl.arizona.edu/~**
    >> jscotti/ <http://www.lpl.arizona.edu/%7Ejscotti/>
    >>
    >
    
    It is difficult to say what is impossible, for the dream of yesterday is
    the hope of today and the reality of tomorrow. - Dr. Robert H. Goddard
    ----------
    Jim Scotti
    Lunar & Planetary Laboratory
    University of Arizona
    Tucson, AZ 85721 USA                 http://www.lpl.arizona.edu/~jscotti/
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