Re: Any active tethered satellites?

From: Alain Figer via Seesat-l <seesat-l_at_satobs.org>
Date: Sun, 29 Oct 2017 12:42:49 +0100
According to Wikipedia the list of the tethered missions is the following :


   - 2Tether flights on human space missions
   <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#Tether_flights_on_human_space_missions>
      - 2.1Gemini 11
      <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#Gemini_11>
      - 2.2Shuttle TSS missions
      <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#Shuttle_TSS_missions>
         - 2.2.1TSS-1 mission
         <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#TSS-1_mission>
         - 2.2.2TSS-1R mission
         <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#TSS-1R_mission>
      - 3Tethers on satellite missions
   <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#Tethers_on_satellite_missions>
      - 3.1Yo-Yo Despin
      <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#Yo-Yo_Despin>
      - 3.2NASA Small Expendable Deployer System Experiments
      <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#NASA_Small_Expendable_Deployer_System_Experiments>
         - 3.2.1SEDS I
         <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#SEDS_I>
         - 3.2.2SEDS II
         <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#SEDS_II>
         - 3.2.3PMG
         <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#PMG>
      - 3.3NRL TiPS and ATEx Experiments
      <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#NRL_TiPS_and_ATEx_Experiments>
         - 3.3.1TiPS
         <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#TiPS>
         - 3.3.2ATEx
         <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#ATEx>
      - 3.4Young Engineers' Satellite (YES)
      <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#Young_Engineers.27_Satellite_.28YES.29>
         - 3.4.1YES
         <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#YES>
         - 3.4.2YES2
         <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#YES2>
      - 3.5KITE Experiment
      <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#KITE_Experiment>
      - 3.6CubeSat Tether Missions
      <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#CubeSat_Tether_Missions>
         - 3.6.1MAST
         <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#MAST>
         - 3.6.2STARS
         <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#STARS>
         - 3.6.3STARS-II
         <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#STARS-II>
         - 3.6.4ESTCube-1
         <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#ESTCube-1>
      - 4Sounding rocket flights
   <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#Sounding_rocket_flights>
      - 4.1CHARGE 2
      <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#CHARGE_2>
      - 4.2OEDIPUS
      <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#OEDIPUS>
      - 4.3T-Rex <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#T-Rex>
   - 5Proposed and future missions
   <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#Proposed_and_future_missions>
      - 5.1ProSEDS
      <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#ProSEDS>
      - 5.2STARS-C
      <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#STARS-C>
      - 5.3CubeSat technology
      <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tether_missions#CubeSat_technology>
      - 5.4MiTEE


      Alain


2017-10-29 11:28 GMT+01:00 Björn Gimle via Seesat-l <seesat-l_at_satobs.org>:

> These two were launched separately, and should not be tethered.
>
> But according to predictions yesterday (for my location!) they were just 13
> km apart, and practically in the same orbits - cross-track separation +- 3
> km or so.
>
> NOSS 3-x satellites are 80-120 km apart, and their orbits intertwine, so
> they usually also have lateral separation.
>
> Attached spreadsheet is only useful near culmination, and is based on
> angular separation (measured by HeavenSat tool)
>
> (An better tool is Rob Matson's (16-bit?) COLA program)
>
> torsdag 26 oktober 2017 skrev Young, Brad via Seesat-l <
> seesat-l_at_satobs.org
> >:
>
> > Bob King said:
> > > I have a friend who saw something in the sky last night that sounds
> like
> > a tethered satellite mission. I used to enjoy watching TiPS with "Ralph"
> > and "Norton." Are there any active tethered satellites today?
> >
> > Could this have been TerraSAR-X and Tandem-X? Location and time?
> >
> > http://satobs.org/seesat/Oct-2017/0103.html
> >
> > Brad Young Visual:
> > Bright:20 x 80 Celestron binoculars
> > Dim:22" f/4.2 UC Obsession
> > COSPAR 8336 =TULSA1 +36.139208,-95.983429 660ft, 201m
> > COSPAR 8335 =TULSA2 +35.8311  -96.1411 1083ft, 330m
> > Remote Imaging:
> > 7779 32.92 -105.528 7000 Mayhill, New Mexico USA
> > 7778 -31.2733 149.0644 3400 Siding Spring, NSW, Australia
> > 7777 38.165653 -2.326735 5150 Nerpio, Spain
> > 7780 37.07 -119.4 4610 Auberry CA USA
> > 7782 -32.008 -116.135 984 Perth, WA, Australia
> > Numbers above and methods explained at: http://www.satobs.org/seesat/J
> > an-2015/0074.html
> >
> >
> >
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> >
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Received on Sun Oct 29 2017 - 06:43:28 UTC

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