Obs 15 Sept 2005 Part 1

From: Greg Roberts (grr@iafrica.com)
Date: Fri Sep 16 2005 - 11:41:44 EDT

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    Observations 15 Sep 2005  Part 1
    ---------------------------------
    
    Cosatrak 1 (Computerised satellite Tracking System).
    MINTRON low light level CCD surveillance camera (0.005 lux typical
    in non integration mode) and 0.00005 lux in STARLIGHT mode with 128
    frame integration. Due to bright sky it is not worthwhile integrating
    more than 48 frames which is equivalent to an exposure of 0.96 seconds.
    
    Used with 145mm focal length f/2.5 lens giving a field of view of
    about 2.55 x 1.86 degrees.
    
    Site 0433 : Longitude 18.51294 deg East, Latitude  33.94058 deg S,
    Elevation 10 metres - situated in Pinelands (Cape Town), South Africa
    
    Conditions not that great on account of near full moon.Eventually
    stopped by mist.
    
    
    23533 95 015A   0433 F 20050915174126500 17 15 0439116-674513 39  +072 05
    23533 95 015A   0433 F 20050915174136700 17 15 0435242-684451 39  +072 05
    02481 66 089A   0433 F 20050915184422600 17 15 1855317+073017 39  +700 05
    11852 80 052C   0433 F 20050915191253900 17 15 1802342-525324 39  +095 05
    11852 80 052C   0433 F 20050915191413300 17 15 1811009-302838 39  +090 05
    11852 80 052C   0433 F 20050915191525000 17 15 1813417-110606 39  +095 05
    20344 89 061D   0433 F 20050915192450800 17 15 1741263+192454 39  +080 05
    20344 89 061D   0433 F 20050915192729500 17 15 1748175+163735 39  +080 05
    20344 89 061D   0433 F 20050915193056900 17 15 1757063+125300 39  +080 05
    22639 93 026B   0433 F 20050915193657800 17 15 1506451-330951 39  +090 05
    22639 93 026B   0433 F 20050915193731100 17 15 1534190-280429 39  +095 05
    25874 99 041C   0433 F 20050915193814600 17 15 1549175-244610 39  +070 05
    
    Special Object:
    ---------------
    
    93141 07 001A   0433 F 20050915175822800 17 15 1714597+062734 39  +100 05
    93141 07 001A   0433 F 20050915180337700 17 15 1734118+063420 39  +102 05
    93141 07 001A   0433 F 20050915180535400 17 15 1740267+063651 39  +094 05
    93141 07 001A   0433 F 20050915180739600 17 15 1746373+064021 39  +105 05
    93141 07 001A   0433 F 20050915181049100 17 15 1755128+064503 39  +100 05
    93141 07 001A   0433 F 20050915181258400 17 15 1800367+064819 39  +100 05
    93141 07 001A   0433 F 20050915181606500 17 15 1807525+065338 39  +105 05
    93141 07 001A   0433 F 20050915182000800 17 15 1815596+070013 39  +098 05
    93141 07 001A   0433 F 20050915182855800 17 15 1831537+071525 39  +102 05
    93141 07 001A   0433 F 20050915183934500 17 15 1847028+073232 39  +106 05
    93141 07 001A   0433 F 20050915185056800 17 15 1900058+075045 39  +111 05
    93141 07 001A   0433 F 20050915185949400 17 15 1908400+080338 39  +100 05
    93141 07 001A   0433 F 20050915191035700 17 15 1917401+081838 39  +111 05
    
    
    Notes:
    ------
    
    (1) Main reason for tracking,despite near full moon, was to try and track
    object 93141 for which Bill Gray of Project Pluto had provided element
    sets over an extended period. The elements used for the above track are as
    follows:
    
    
    
    Obj 05-257
    1 93141U 07001A   05257.00000000 -.00000000 +00000-0 +00000-0 0 00010
    2 93141  17.2336 287.6276 8598146 226.1078 232.7346  0.78805950000006
    
    
    This is not a particularly easy object as it appears to have a period of
    variability around 1 min 45 seconds ( approximate!),ranging from about
    magnitude 10 at 11000 kilometres to invisibility (fainter than 12th
    magnitude.)
    
    The object was first located at a range of about 11000 kilometres and followed
    out to about 31000 kilometres. At maximum brightness the satellite is fairly
    easy at these ranges but as it goes out further ( to around 80000 kilometres)
    the period of visibility gets shorter and shorter. At 30000 kilometres I could
    see the satellite for about 10% of its variability cycle so unless you were
    looking in the correct place you would probably miss it. Besides the
    regular period it appeared to have an occassional brief flash when not at
    maximum. I am pretty certain I would not be able to detect this satellite
    at a range greater than 40000 kilometres ( but I will try :-)))
    
    
    (2) I still have a few of the regular geostationaries to measure which
    hopefully will be reported tomorrow.
    
    Cheers
    Greg
    
    
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